Homeowners can effectively reduce the number of mosquitoes around their homes and neighborhoods by eliminating standing water where mosquitoes grow and breed.

* Dispose of any refuse that can hold water, such as tin cans, containers, and in particular, used tires.

Tires have become the most important mosquito-breeding sites in the country.

* Drill holes in the bottoms of recycling containers and check uncovered junk piles.

* Clean clogged roof gutters every year, and check storm drains, leaky outdoor faucets, and window wells.

* Empty accumulated water from wheelbarrows, boats, cargo, trailers, pet dishes, toys, and ceramic pots. If possible, turn these items over when not in use.

* Do not allow water to stagnate in birdbaths, ornamental pools, water gardens, and swimming pools or their covers. Ornamental pools can be aerated or stocked with fish. Swimming pools should be cleaned and chlorinated when not in use.

* Alter the landscape of your property to eliminate standing water. Keep in mind that during warm weather, mosquitoes can breed in any puddle of water.



MMAD employs seasonal field workers from May to September. These workers travel the MMAD area and sample ponds, gutters and other standing water for mosquito larvae.

If larvae is found, they take a small sample of the larvae back to the office to be identified, so we know what type of mosquitoes are in the area.

The infected area is then treated with the proper chemicals, determined by the size of the area and the stage of the larvae.

If the mosquitoes have already hatched into adults, there is a "fogger" truck that can be used at dusk and dawn. This truck sprays a fog behind itself that will kill adult mosquitoes.

Every situation is different and needs to be analyzed according to certain variables (i.e. location, stage of larvae, accessibility, etc.)

If you are having a mosquito problem, submit a

and we'll get in contact with you to let you know what can be done for your situation.